Monthly Archives: October 2020

ASHTON UNDER LYNE THERAPEUITIC SERIVICES – GET IN CONTACT TODAY

As an expert BACP/ FDAP registered Psychotherapist I work with men and women to communicate more effectively, address anger issues, domestic violence or anxieties, related work issues, under achievement, Covid pandemic, relationships, cultural intersectionality families, unemployment or uncertainties, etc.    I work online and internationally with clients in the states, Caribbean and Africa. Offer competitive rates. Initial consultation is free up to 30 minutes.

Please contact Cornetta on 07956771843.  Thank you for your support 

ROLE MODEL OF THE WEEK, PRIMROSE MAGALA FROM UGANDA

Primrose Magala is originally from Uganda and now works as an Ophthalmic Nurse Practitioner at the world-renowned Moorfields Eye Hospital, in London.

Having made a career change following a life changing experience a few years ago, this inspired her to pursue a career in healthcare and specialise in ophthalmology.

Ophthalmology remains a neglected sector in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, thanks to emerging Global Sustainable Development initiatives and collaborative partnerships, Eye Health Uganda (and Eye Health Africa launching soon) has been formed as a great platform to support positive and sustainable healthcare transformation in Africa.

Eye Health is now a global concern (WHO 2020) with over 39 million people blind and over 285 million visually impaired, at least 70% of these are in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Primrose’s vision is to work with other partners, experts and stakeholders via an Africa wide Consortium platform, to set up Centres of Excellence and Institutes in Africa so that everyone has access to health care. 

This will also mean that no one will have to leave the Continent to access these essential health services.

It is no longer a matter of, let someone else do it, but rather, let us do something about it together. Let us work together to utilise all available opportunities, resources, networks and platforms to develop health and economic systems in Africa.

THE BIG BLACK MAN WITH NO NAME- WRITTEN BY TONY TOKUNBO FERNANDEZ

THE BIG BLACK MAN WITH NO NAME- WRITTEN BY TONY TOKUNBO FERNANDEZ

Your presence is enough,

to provoke a silent storm within the chosen territories of cold eyes.

YOU STAND OUT- like an awkward jigsaw embraced in a poor puzzle,

 And each time you move, the world is also moved in silence.

Your presence is enough,

to confuse the energy of a new crowd,

for all you can feel is layers and boundaries of hidden thoughts,

tucked in the energy of old secrets.

All they can feel is your PRESENCE,

And in that split second – All they can see and all they know,

is “THE BIG BLACK MAN WITH NO NAME”

WRITTEN BY Tony Tokunbo Eteka Fernandez

THE AMAZING JOHNNY NASH DIES AT 80

The amazing Johnny Nash has died at the age of 80. This great musical legend took the world by storm for very many years with great hit such as “I can see clearly now”. He died of natural causes and will always be remembered by numerous fans around the world

ABOUT THE ARTIST

John Lester “Johnny” Nash, Jr. (born August 19, 1940) is an American pop singer- songwriter, best known in the US for his 1972 comeback hit, “I Can See Clearly Now”. He was also one of the first non-Jamaican singers to record reggae music in Kingston, Jamaica.

Born John Lester Nash, Jr. in Houston, Texas, he began as a pop singer in the 1950s. He also enjoyed success as an actor early in his career appearing in the screen version of playwright Louis S. Peterson’s Take a Giant Step. Nash won a Silver Sail Award for his performance from the Locarno International Film Festival.

In 1965, Johnny Nash and Danny Sims formed the JAD label in New York. One of the more interesting signings was four brothers from Newport, Rhode Island, ages 9, 11, 15 and 16, called The Cowsills, before signing with Mercury/Philips with Shelby Singleton, before MGM and their first million selling hit single, “The Rain, The Park & Other Things”. The Cowsills went into the studio in New York with studio musicians and recorded a number of songs like “Either You Do Or You Don’t” and “You Can’t Go Halfway”. Eventually The Cowsills would write and record their own song, “All I Really Wanta Be Is Me”, which became the group’s debut single release on JODA (J-103).

Besides “I Can See Clearly Now,” Nash recorded several hits in Jamaica, where he travelled in early 1968, as his girlfriend had family links with local TV and radio host and novel writer Neville Willoughby. Nash planned to try breaking the local rocksteady sound in the United States. Willoughby introduced him to a local struggling vocal group, The Wailers. Members Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer and Peter Tosh introduced him to the local scene. Nash signed all three to an exclusive publishing and recording contract with his JAD label and financed some of their recordings, some with Byron Lee’s Dragonaires and some with other local musicians such as Jackie Jackson and Lynn Taitt. None of the Marley and Tosh songs he produced were successful. Only two singles were released at the time: “Bend Down Low” (JAD 1968) and “Reggae on Broadway” (Columbia, 1972), which was recorded in London in 1972 on the same sessions that produced “I Can See Clearly Now.” It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in November 1972. The I Can See Clearly Now album includes four original Marley compositions published by JAD: “Guava Jelly”, “Comma Comma”, “You Poured Sugar On Me” and the follow-up hit “Stir It Up”. “There Are More Questions Than Answers” was a third hit single taken from the album.

Nash was also active as a composer in the Swedish romance Vill så gärna tro (1971) in which he portrayed Robert. The film soundtrack, partly instrumental reggae with strings, was co-composed by Bob Marley and arranged by Fred Jordan.

SOURCE- JOHNNY NASH WEBSITE

IN CELEBRATION OF LONDONS FIRST BLACK MAYOR – JOHN ARCHER

John Archer was the first person of African descent to hold civic office in London. He was also the first British black person to represent his country at an international conference abroad, and the first black person to become an election agent for a constituency Labour Party.

He was born on the 8th June 1863, in Liverpool. His father, Richard, was a ship’s steward from Barbados, and his mother Mary Theresa, was Irish. Almost nothing is known of his early life. He was in his late 20s when he and his wife, a black Canadian, set up home at 55 Brynmaer Road, at the south end of Battersea Park. Archer earned his living as a photographer, with a studio in Battersea Park Road; he appears to have been successful as a photographer, for his work won many prizes. He then turned his interest to local politics, and was elected to the borough council in 1906, as one of the six councillors for the Latchmere ward, where he topped the poll with 1,051 votes. He lost his seat in 1909, but won it again three years later. On 10th November 1913, he was elected mayor of Battersea. The population at the time was 167,000 and the council’s annual income from rates was over £400,000. The newly elected mayor told the council,

OUR BOOKLET EXPLORES THE JOURNEY OF ORGANIZING BLACK HISTORY AT UK HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT

Its BLACK HISTORY MONTH and We are pleased to inform you that copies of our BOOKLET that explores THE JOURNEY OF ORGANIZING BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATIONS AT THE UK HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT FOR MANY YEARS are still available.

The Journey of organizing Black History at The UK House of Parliament would not have been successful without the historical achievements of change makers in our community.

Also get to find out who these change makers in this Booklet.

GET A COPY TODAY FOR JUST 3 POUNDS, 50 PENCE VIA PAYPAL TO afripoet@hotmail.com or CALL IS NOW ON +447882809005

We ALSO have a batch of COPIES FOR SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES as part of BLACK HISTORY MONTH, if you would also like to place large orders for SCHOOLS and LIBRARIES, CALL US NOW ON +447882809005

www.tonyfernandez.co.uk

“The Story of the Windrush” by Kandace Chimbiri from Barbados

Join author Kandace Chimbiri for a talk about her book The Story of the Windrush, in conversation with Samantha Williams from Book Love. This event will explore the legacy of the Windrush pioneers and writing non-fiction for children.

About the book:
In June 1948, hundreds of Caribbean men, women and children arrivedin London on a ship called the HMT Empire Windrush. Although there were already Black people living in Britain at the time, this event marks the beginning of modern Black Britain. Combining historical fact with voices from the Windrush Generation, this book sensitively tells the inspiring story of the Windrush Generation pioneers for younger readers.

About Kandace:
Born in London, England in 1968 to parents from Barbados, Kandace Chimbiri is the author of Black history books for children. Motivated by a desire to help improve both children’s literacy as well as their knowledge of history, Kandace founded her small publishing house Golden Destiny Ltd in 2009. Golden Destiny specialises in non-fiction titles for children, in particular Black history before mass enslavement. She is now an author of Scholastic Children’s Books where she will be republishing her brilliant titles in an all-new look and format.

IN MEMORY OF THE LATE SIXTUS ALEXANDER PEDRO FERNANDEZ – FOUNDER OF THE FIRST ACTIVE PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO IN NIGERIA

IN MEMORY OF THE LATE SIXTUS ALEXANDER PEDRO FERNANDEZ – FOUNDER OF THE FIRST ACTIVE PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO IN NIGERIA

History is not only the study of the past, our narratives and the true stories of events, it also entails the stories of people and their actions as well as the impact these stories have on many communities around the world.

For many centuries, oral tradition had not only taken centre stage as a source of history from our past, it had also become the norm in very many West African settings as the way we shared our stories and our experiences.

Unfortunately, the drawback sometimes of Oral tradition is that it is not always recorded and there are still countless stories within the Nigerian context which are not only  inspirational, but they also do not make it into our precious history books.

One of such stories is the legacy of THE LATE SIXTUS ALEXANDER PEDRO FERNANDEZ – FOUNDER OF THE FIRST ACTIVE PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO IN NIGERIA AND A LEADING PHILANTHROPIST that played a prominent role in many peoples lives.

The studio was first set up in the year 1924 at Egerton Street, Henshaw Town, Calabar.

He not only focused on photography as a key area, but also the provision of sports and camera equipment’s.

It is no surprise that members of The Fernandez Family in Nigeria are still absorbed with fond memories of this great philanthropist who shaped the lives of many Efik and Yoruba people in Nigeria and inspired many with a unique sense of leadership, integrity and vision.

It is also no surprise also that his warmth, hospitality, people’s skills and interest for the community still runs in the family of the older and younger generation. This is not only reflected by the fact that he spoke English, Portuguese, Efik and Yoruba fluently but he also engaged in promoting the essence of community cohesion and social well-being among various communities in the present day South South Nigeria.

My Father, Mr S.O Fernandez still has fond memories of my late Grandfather as an inspirational icon with a warm heart and also the regional leader of the Yoruba people in Calabar.  He recalls how members of the Yoruba community in Calabar will gather in Grandfathers home for regular meetings and how he promoted and encouraged the positive cohesion of local leaders within the vicinity.

He was a strict practicing Catholic and would wake up at 5am every Sunday for mass no matter how much it rained. 

It would probably not be wrong to assume that he was not only very punctual but quite particular and so on several occasions would arrive at Church before it opened and even wake up the priest by hitting his front door with a heavy wooden stick.

In the year 1963, The late Chief Obafemi Awolowo (A prominent leading Nigerian nationalist and strong advocate for Nigerian independence) was imprisoned for plotting to other throw the former Nigerian Federal government.

The prison sentence was to last for ten years but Chief Obafemi Awolowo was released from Calabar prison in August 1966. This was not only a historical turning point in the crucial developments of a great nation but it was also a strong  indicator of other major events to unfold.

My Father also recalls of how Chief Obafemi Awolowo stayed in our home in Calabar with our late Grandfather for a few days, before returning back to the West.

My Mother, Mrs P Fernandez also worked with Port Health, Lagos in the seventies.  She proudly recalls how she attended to VIP Patients in a special room one morning and came across Justice Candidi Johnson and family.

When she had finished attending to them, he was curious to know which of the Fernandez family my mother belonged to.

My Mother told him that her husband was the son of the late Sixtus Pedro Fernandez who lived in Calabar. She recalls how Justice Johnsons eyes immediately lit up and he began to tell her stories of the late Sixtus Pedro Fernandez and how his home was haven for people and visitors from all works of life.

My senior Aunty, Aunty Georgina Fernandez also has very fond memories of the late Sixtus Pedro Fernandez as an amazing humanitarian who always went the extra mile to ensure that the welfare of local citizens was a priority.   She recalls of how he not only made sure that all his children were educated, but also paid the school fees of many Efik indigenes who could not afford their fees as the time. 

According to Aunty Georgina, the late Sixtus Pedro Fernandez was a strict catholic with a methodical approach to life. She also remembers that he had a senior sister who lived in the same house as him called Mrs. Victoria Harding. Mrs Harding was also referred to as “Big Mama”.

Late Sixtus Pedro Fernandez was the son of an enterprising entrepreneur from Brazil who married a Nigerian woman.

The late Sixtus Pedro Fernandez also had a cousin in Brazil who he used to visit frequently.

He also had relations that lived in The Campus square (A vicinity of Lagos island that still maintains a  historical reputation as a melting pot of Brazilian descendants but also an area deeply associated with a Portuguese influence of architecture and names (Just like many parts of Lagos.)

In my view, the legacy of the late Sixtus Alexander Pedro Fernandez truly represents the essence and impact of community cohesion, social wellbeing, positive collaboration, value systems and the importance of working together as part the spirit of nation building.

Nigeria is not only a thriving and colorful melting pot of culture, belief systems, traditions and a people with a wide range of diversity, it is a nation of incredibly complex and diverse regional families with so many differences.

The legacy and example of the late Sixtus Alexander Pedro Fernandez also represents the need to rise above our differences as a nation and embrace the spirit of working together and appreciating our differences.

There are so many other success stories that cannot be found in history books, but the best part of history is when we are able to embrace each moment and quietly inspire our communities with a raw sense of leadership, humility and example. 

Tony Tokunbo Eteka Fernandez

FERNANDEZ HISTORICAL SOCIETY

ROLE MODEL OF THE WEEK, CLARISSA MUDUKITI – INSPIRATIONAL WRITER FROM ZIMBABWE

My Story

I’ve never wanted to tie myself down to any one path or career, and this site showcases the many journeys I’ve taken, and still taking.  After all variety is the spice of life.  I was born in the United Kingdom, and grew up in Zimbabwe.  I feel very privileged, to be influenced by two different cultures, and life styles. 

​I enjoy gatherings, working and playing (together).  I am an optimist, believing that anything through Christ is possible! say amen now.

With each project I embark on, I approach it with enthusiasm and focus on detail.

Do explore my blogs, motivational events and visuals.

I hope you find it to be thought provoking, and sparks something from the inside you. 

​I am proudly African, an African l writer,  and motivator, as you will discover. 

You can be your best motivator!

I received my primary and high school education in Zimbabwe.  I had the pleasure of attending and experiencing both private and government schools.  High school was a blast, I attended Roosevelt High, a government school in Harare.

My university years were in the UK.  Hull University gave me my qualification in (BSC) in Business Management, years later, London South Bank University gave me my Law qualification in LLM Civil Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution.  When I say “gave”, I actually mean I studied hard and earned my qualifications.

By the way, I completed my Masters degree at the age of 41, so its never too late, just put your mind to it.  Who knows, I might do my PHD next…